There are many benefits to waxing versus other forms of hair removal. It is an effective method to remove large amounts of hair at one time. It is a long-lasting method, as hair in waxed areas will not grow back for two to eight weeks. When hair is shaved or removed by depilatory cream, the hair is removed at the surface rather than the hair root. Within a few days, the hair can reappear back at the surface. With these methods, hair tends to grow back in a rough stubble. Areas that are repeatedly waxed over long periods of time often exhibit regrowth that is softer.

There are many drawbacks of waxing as well. Waxing can be painful when the strip is removed from the skin. Although the pain is not long-lasting, it can be intense, particularly in sensitive areas. Another drawback to waxing is the expense: waxing is usually performed by a licensed esthetician and in some cases the cost can be high, depending on the area waxed and the number of sittings required. There are do-it-yourself waxing supplies, but they may be difficult to use on oneself on some areas on the body.

Another drawback of waxing is that some people experience ingrown hairs, red bumps, and minor Hi, this is Browse.ME (Laptop Repair), eeding. This is more likely to occur when waxing areas with thick hair, especially the first few times when follicles are strongest.

The Nature of Questions

According to Kuvaas (2011), the effectiveness of a performance appraisal interview is highly dependent on the nature of the questions asked. While structuring the questions, an appraiser should factor in two types of questions namely open and probing ones. Open questions are general rather than specific, and they give people a chance to decide on how they want to respond without any restrictions. On the contrary, probing questions are intended to dig deeper so that the appraisee can give specific answers. Probing questions should be included in the interview process so as to offer support to the appraisee and motivated to provide additional information related to the open-ended responses given. Appraisees should be encouraged to be free while talking about what they feel right, as well as their attitudes to the work and working environment. Free communication in the interview process helps the management obtain all adequate information that would assist in the decision making. Besides, the information provided can be used in assessing the contributions that the appraisee has made for the organization since his or her recruitment.

Good Listening Skills

Communication is a two-way process that is only achieved through listening and speaking. It is essential for the appraiser to pay attention to the appraisee's responses, as they will determine the nature of the report at the end of the process (Piggot-Irvine, 1999). The appraiser should be able to do more of listening, and only take the shortest time possible for asking questions. Listening makes the interview process fruitful as all participants feel valued and respected. It is opposed to a situation where an appraiser dominates the interview with a lot of follow-up questions hence giving little opportunity to the appraisee to respond. It should be understood that the appraisee is the source of information in the context of a performance appraisal interview. As such, the appraiser should demonstrate the willingness to hear more than to speak as a way of encouraging the appraisee to open up and talk. Additionally, the appraiser should use an appropriate tone and voice that will shorten the social distance between him/her and the appraiser. Differences in status should not come out clearly, as they would prevent free interaction. Generally, good listening occurs when the speaker is aware of different nuances, like behavior or body language that supplement the verbal communication. A good listener knows how to respond quickly when necessary but still tries to avoid interruptions. When given unclear responses, an appraiser should ask relevant questions while seeking for clarification of the meaning. An appraiser should always give comments to demonstrate that he or she understands the appraisee's answers. However, Piggot-Irvine (1999) suggests that the comments should be kept short never to inhibit the flow of the speaker.

Need for Provision of the Feedback

The interview process is not complete without provision of the feedback to the appraisee. The feedback given after an interview should be based on the facts rather than the individual's opinion and should always be supported by evidence and examples. Feedback makes the interview process complete as it promotes the appraisee's understanding of the impacts of his previous actions and performance on the organization. In case the interview process showed that something had gone wrong, the feedback might be given in a form of corrective actions aimed at avoiding re-occurrence of such undesirable acts in the future. In all situations, feedback should be positively used to reinforce the employee's good deeds and qualities and show the opportunities for more positive actions. Feedback should be given by the right people who have the skills required. Those who lack good communication skills may give feedback in a way that will elicit a conflict particularly if the feedback involves suggestions for improvement.

Appraisal Interviews as a Performance Management Tool

Performance management is regarded by Horvath and Andrews (2007) a vital macro-descriptor that involves all micro processes related to personnel management. The process of performance appraisal starts when employees join an organization and should continue through out their time of employment. The performance appraisal interviews are very significant to every organization as they are used to ensure effective performance management. The effective performance management interviews require specific skills to be exhibited by the appraiser in order to make the whole process effective. Organizations need to establish a culture of performing annual appraisal interviews as a way of developing the skills of their employees. The performance appraisal interviews are meant to show high levels of respectful, trust-based, and open relationships between the appraiser and the appraisee as a way of ensuring that the appraisal process is effective. The interview process should not be considered merely a process that requires good listening and questioning skills. The process is complex and it should be treated with a lot of caution in order to achieve the intended purpose. Interpersonal interaction has been marked as a key requirement in ensuring an effective performance appraisal interview.

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Horvath and Andrews (2007) also note that the performance appraisal interviews are vital as a performance management tool that increases the employees' level of productivity. Whenever an organization takes a keen interest in conducting annual appraisal interviews, the organization increases its chances of retaining highly qualified and competent employees that can help it to match favorably its competitors into the market. Employees also get motivated when their efforts are recognized by their organizations. Recognition may be demonstrated through promotions or salary increment as a way of appreciating the employee's good performance. Similarly, the performance appraisal interviews can enable an organization to identify the areas of weakness in its employees so that the required corrective measures are taken in good time.

It is vital for all managers who are expected to carry out the performance appraisal to pass some form of training that can help them acquire necessary skills and competence for the exercise. The training should not only be focused on the skills development but also should target to inform the managers about the essence of conducting the performance appraisal. Therefore, the trainings are to be organized in a way that they do not only focus on the "how" part of the appraisal interview but also look at the "why" aspect. The performance appraisal is a strategic process of enhancing the organization's performance. Those involved in the process need to view the interview as a developmental strategy. It will enable them to understand how the interview fit into the wider strategic process of the performance management. The information gathered during the interviews is to be used in understanding how the organization's human resources add value to the business strategy and success (Nurse, 2005).

The appraiser needs to consider a number of factors. First, it is vital to consider how well the appraisee has performed over time since he or she joined the organization. Showing an appreciation for the role that the appraisee has performed in the organization will make him or her feel encouraged to work harder on the future assignments. Appreciation and acknowledgement of the past performances is also vital in urging the appraiser to volunteer information that is vital for the organization. Appreciation of an employee involves a research of the employee's job descriptions and analyzing how the employee has performed the duties assigned. The assessment forms a basis for understanding the pieces of advice that needs to be given to the employee to boost his or her future performance (Nurse, 2005).

The interviews may also be structured in a way that allows appraisees an opportunity to do a self-assessment. Self-assessment gives employees an opportunity to analyze their own performance before the actual interview. When given a chance, appraisees are best suited to be more responsive during the interview as they have adequate time to think about their experience in the organization and the measures that can be taken to boost the organization's performance. Through self-assessment, appraisees can also understand the corrections suggested to them so that they do not appear to be imposed on them. They have ample time to give their own opinion concerning the suggested changes. It is only possible for self-assessment to realize its purpose if there are well set out standards and targets, according to which the appraisees are able to assess themselves (Verma, Budhwar, & DeNisi, 2008). Additionally, appraisers need to establish a climate of trust during the interview process so that the appraisees can be convinced that appraisers will not take advantage of the free self-assessment. Adequate measures must be put in place to enhance an effective self-assessment process.

Recommendations for Business Practice

This discussion has shown the essential considerations that need to be made to enhance efficiency when carrying out an appraisal interview. The essentials form the basis upon which a number of recommendations are made for organizations to uphold good business practices. The recommendations are also based on the findings from some scholarly works done by other researchers in the field of performance management. Organizations should be keen in managing their human resource so that they remain viable and competent in the job market. The only sure way to achieve this mandate is to recruit and retain a productive work force through the effective recruitment and appraisal processes.